WordPress made its way into the web space years ago, and now there are scores of myths surrounding it. Some of them sound really weird and need to be dispelled righ tnow. Let’s consider the five weirdest and most common ones.

Myth One: WordPress has a limited functionality.

Maybe it did many years ago, when it was just starting and was good as but a blogging platform. But not these days! By now, WordPress has evolved into a powerful content management system accounting for about a 25% share of the global Internet market! There are tons of customizable plugins and widgets available and compatible with the platform allowing you to extend your website’s functionality beyond all limits imaginable. Many top-level corporations, news agencies, educational projects, etc., have built their websites on WordPress, because they do have good reasons to choose it!

Myth Two: WordPress is not secure.

To start with, there is hardly a platform on earth that is completely hack-proof. Yes, the hack stats look quite so intimidating, and WordPress does seem to suffer a larger amount of attacks than some other platforms. However, it is just the reverse side of the popularity coin, since a good piece attracts not only good boys and girls. Have you ever wondered why the global Internet is still going smooth but for maybe a small number of occasional breakdowns, which do not mean on a global scale? Would it be this stable if WordPress was really insecure? Security has been a number-one priority for WordPress ever since its inception. Every new update brings a handful of advanced security options and opportunities for using compatible plugins like iThemes Security.

Myth Three: WordPress is free and therefore not good for commercial use.

WordPress is associated in users’ hearts and minds with a handful of freedoms: once you are at it, you are free to tailor your WordPress resource as you please. You are not going to face any limitations or request permissions, because WordPress was built by a group of contributors and is not owned by a particular person or organization. Yes, you also get a free subdomain and hosting. However, those who choose free options have to face a number of limitations in terms of features and versatility. They cannot count on personalized hosting or personal domain name. Those seeking complete functionality end up paying more than $2000 per month. Second, there was a time when WordPress was the last thing one would choose for ecommerce business. Those days are long gone: there are tons of ecommerce plugins and frameworks, from which one can build a fully functional online store.

Myth Four: WordPress is not future-proof.

Many users say that WordPress will not be able to withstand the growing traffic load. If that was the case, there would have been pieces of news every day about global multinational corporations (many of which run their sites on WordPress) coming crashing down because of traffic spikes. In fact, it is a particular web host, not WordPress, who is responsible for traffic spikes, if any. Second, WordPress uses all sorts of themes and plugins, and they are increasingly flexible. It means that you can operate your website from any type of device (PC, tablet, smartphone, etc.) with the help of WordPress mobile plugins. As we can see, WordPress is absolutely future-proof both in terms of scalability and responsiveness.

Myth Five: WordPress-based websites are slow.

No way! Today, WordPress uses semantic XHTML and effective coding. If your website runs slow, most likely, you are using a cheap web host, who has loaded its server with thousands of websites. In turn, you should choose high quality plugins with high quality codes. This will get your website to work like clock and keep you secure against intruders.

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